• NEW VACCINATION AND TESTING REQUIREMENTS - WHAT IT MEANS FOR QPS AND YOU

    by Robert Hoeft | Sep 20, 2021

    President Biden recently launched the “Path Out of The Pandemic Action Plan.” One of
    the elements of the plan states that any company with over 100 employees either require their employees to be vaccinated or have a process for weekly testing to be conducted for the unvaccinated.

    QPS, like all staffing companies, counts all of our associate employees in our headcount, not just those working at one location. Customers like yourself may fall into either category.

    • If you have less than 100 employees and do not need to follow this rule, we will work
      to be sure our employees remain compliant.
    • On the other hand, if you are a company with 100 plus internal employees, you will
      be required to perform the same requirements as QPS, and we would like to help you
      with that strategy and partner together.

    OSHA will issue an Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) to implement this expected
    new rule. It is expected that this rule will impact over 80 million workers in the private
    sector. The announcement included a statement that the rule will include the requirement for employers to provide paid time off for the time employees take to get vaccinated or to recover if they experience post-vaccination side effects.

    As you can imagine, there are many unanswered questions. We don’t have the actual
    OSHA rule itself yet and can only hope it will provide clarity.

    With this new curveball being thrown, we are closely watching, planning and will keep
    both yourself and our associates informed with the latest as we understand it.

  • August's Job Report: Rate Drops to 5.2%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Sep 03, 2021

    August’s job report saw a gain of 235,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in professional and business services, transportation and warehousing, private education, manufacturing, and other services. Employment in retail trade declined over the month.

    August’s unemployment rate declined to 5.2%, down from 5.4% in July. The civilian labor force participation was 61.7%, unchanged from July.

    The report found that average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls rose by 17 cents to $30.73.

     

     

  • RAPID JOB GROWTH TO CONTINUE: THE CONFERENCE BOARD

    by Robert Hoeft | Aug 18, 2021

    Strong job growth in the US will continue, according to The Conference Board Employment Trends Index. However, a tight labor market will also remain.

    “The Employment Trends Index remained on its historically strong upward trajectory, suggesting rapid job growth is likely to continue over the next several months,” said Gad Levanon, head of The Conference Board Labor Markets Institute. “This high mark comes off the back of nearly 1 million new jobs added in both June and July and a steep decline in the unemployment rate.

    However, recruiting and retention difficulties — and rapid wage growth — are
    expected through the summer, particularly in industries key to the reopening of
    the economy, such as food service and leisure and hospitality.”

    Levanon noted the rapid wage growth is likely to lead to higher inflation in the
    coming year and despite the still-high unemployment rate, many employers are
    having difficulty finding qualified workers. According to the National Federation
    of Independent Business, 49% of firms reported being unable to fill open
    positions in July — an all-time high.

    For many of those currently unemployed, job-search intensity remains low due to an array of factors, according to Levanon. These include enhanced unemployment benefits, fears of getting infected, a lack of childcare, and interest in pursuing and preparing for a different type of career.

    “Going forward, we do expect economic activity in in-person services to be negatively impacted by the current resurgence of infections fueled by the delta variant,” he said. “While this delta wave may produce slight slowdowns in hiring, we expect job growth to remain very strong overall.”

    Source: Staffing Industry Analysts

  • July's Job Report: Rate Drops to 5.4%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Aug 06, 2021

    July’s job report saw a gain of 943,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in leisure and hospitality, in local government education and in professional and business services.

    July’s unemployment rate declined to 5.4%, down from 5.% in June. The civilian labor force participation was 61.7%, little changed from 61.6% in June.

    The report found that average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls rose by 11 cents to $30.54.

     

     

  • PAY RATE, LOCATION, CULTURE AMONG TOP REASONS TEMPS ACCEPT ASSIGNMENTS: SIA REPORT

    by Robert Hoeft | Jul 20, 2021

    Pay rate is the most important criteria temporary workers use to decide whether to take an offered assignment, according to a report by Staffing Industry Analysts. However, other factors also matter.

    “With the labor market as tight as it is right now, staffing firms will need to not just match candidate to assignment but sell the candidate on accepting the assignment,” said Jon Osborne, SIA’s VP strategic research and the author of the report. “The temp preferences identified here should be used to help craft that messaging.”

    Temporary workers were asked, “When considering whether to take a newly offered assignment, what are your three most important criteria?” While 90% said pay rate was among their top three assignment criteria, more than half of respondents also cited “location of assignment” and “working conditions/company culture.”

    Share of temporary workers citing selected options as a top three
    assignment criteria:

    • Pay rate: 90%
    • Location of assignment: 63%
    • Working conditions/company culture: 54%
    • Work/life balance (flexible hours, option to work from home): 43%
    • Close match to your skills: 34%
    • Training offered: 9%

    The queries were part of SIA’s 2021 Temporary Worker Survey conducted in late 2020, which reflects the opinions of 2,223 temporary worker respondents from 21 staffing firms.

    Source: Staffing Industry Analysts

  • HIRING BONUSES MAY CONVINCE UNEMPLOYED TO GET BACK TO WORK: US CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

    by Robert Hoeft | Jul 20, 2021

    Hiring bonuses appear to be an effective way to get more of the unemployed back to work, according to a survey by the US Chamber of Commerce. It found that 39% of unemployed Americans who lost their jobs during the pandemic and are not actively looking for work say that a $1,000 hiring bonus would increase their urgency to return to full-time employment. It was the most appealing solution for hesitant-to-return workers.

    The poll included 506 Americans who lost their jobs during the pandemic and have not returned to full-time employment. It was conducted from May 17 to May 20.

    The percentage who say hiring bonuses could attract them back to the job market was particularly high among unemployed workers age 25 to 34 (53%) and those with some college education but not a degree (49%).

    Other incentives included work-from-home flexibility, picked by 32%, and worker vaccination requirements, picked by 23%.

    Separately, Indeed released data showing that 4.1% of job postings in the week ended June 18th contained hiring incentives, up from 1.8% in the same week last year, Yahoo reported. “Job seekers are able to have a little wiggle room and be able to shop around a little bit more,” AnnElizabeth Konkel, an economist at Indeed Hiring Lab, told Yahoo Finance Live. “Employers are increasingly offering hiring incentives that can be anything from signing bonuses to retention bonuses to cash incentives.”

    Source: Staffing Industry Analysts

  • June's Job Report: Rate Rises to 5.9%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Jul 02, 2021

    June’s job report saw a gain of 850,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in leisure and hospitality, in public and private education, in professional and business services, and retail trade.

    June’s unemployment rate rose to 5.9%, up slightly from 5.8% in May. The civilian labor force participation was 61.6%, unchanged from May.

    The report found that average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls rose by 10 cents to $30.40.

     

     

  • HERE’S WHY RECORD NUMBERS OF AMERICANS ARE QUITTING THEIR JOBS

    by Robert Hoeft | Jun 22, 2021

    More U.S. workers are quitting their jobs than at any time in at least two decades. In April, the share of U.S. workers leaving jobs was 2.7%, according to the Labor Department, a jump from 1.6% a year earlier to the highest level since at least 2000. So why is it happening?

    1. Human resource executives and labor experts foresee a wave of resignations in the coming months and years. 

    In a March survey of 2,000 workers by Prudential Financial Inc., one-quarter of respondents said they plan to soon look for a role with a different employer. “People are
    seeing the world differently,” says Steve Cadigan, a talent consultant who led human
    resources at LinkedIn during its early years. “It’s going to take time for people to think
    through, ‘How do I unattach where I’m at and reattach to something new?’ We’re going
    to see a massive shift in the next few years.”

    2. There are a number of reasons why people are quitting their jobs, including a desire for more flexible work arrangements and burnout from extra pandemic workloads.

     Many people are pushing back against a return to business as usual. Some prefer the
    flexibility of remote work while others are reluctant to be in an office before the virus is
    vanquished. Some workers are burned out from extra pandemic workloads and stress,
    and others are looking for higher pay.

    3. Employers are trying to head off the loss of talent.

    Employers are seeing turnover with their newest employees. At Schneider Electric North America, 65% of the employees identified as high potential got promotions or new roles in 2020, said Mai Lan Nguyen, the industrial company’s senior vice president for human resources. “We’re all on our toes. The best talent out there have many options,” she said.

    Read the full article at https://on.wsj.com/3zKz8dn

    Source: Wall Street Journal

  • May's Job Report: Rate Declines to 5.8%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Jun 04, 2021

    May’s job report saw a gain of 559,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in leisure and hospitality, in public and private education, and in health care and social assistance.

    May’s unemployment rate declined to 5.8%, down from 6.1% in April. The civilian labor force participation was 61.6%, slightly down from 61.7% in April.

    The report found that average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls rose by 15 cents to $30.33.

     

     

  • US MANUFACTURING SKILLS GAP COULD LEAVE AS MANY AS 2.1 MILLION JOBS UNFILLED BY 2030, DELOITTE AND THE MANUFACTURING INSTITUTE STUDY FINDS

    by Robert Hoeft | May 24, 2021

    Left unabated, the manufacturing skills gap — which is now anticipated to leave 2.1 million jobs unfilled by 2030 — could cost the U.S. economy as much as $1 trillion. Deloitte and The Manufacturing Institute’s new report, “Creating pathways for tomorrow’s workforce today: Beyond reskilling in manufacturing,” explores new and prevailing contributors to the skills gap and outlines important steps manufacturers can take to attract and retain skilled and diverse workers, especially women and underrepresented minorities (URMs).

    According to the study, the pandemic outbreak initially erased\ approximately 1.4 million U.S. manufacturing jobs, undoing more than a decade of manufacturing job gains. While the industry was able to hire back 820,000 of these jobs by the end of 2020, the remaining 570,000 had not been added back, despite nearly 500,000 job openings. This is true despite a near-record pace of job openings in the sector. Executives surveyed reported they cannot even fill higher paying entrylevel production positions, let alone find and retain skilled workers for specialized roles.

    The industry appears at a tipping point and should work quickly to change the perception of work in manufacturing for a new generation of workers as well as to diversify the talent pipeline entering the industry. To do so, manufacturers should proactively engage with potential talent pools and also revamp work-life balance, skills training and equitable career pathways to retain employees they cannot afford to lose.

    Read the full article at https://bit.ly/3wg5jPj

    Source: Deloitte

  • April's Job Report: Rate Rises to 6.1%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | May 07, 2021

    April’s job report saw a gain of 266,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in leisure and hospitality, other services, and local government education. Declines happened in temporary help services and couriers and messengers.

    April’s unemployment rate rose to 6.1%, up slightly from 6.0% in March. The civilian labor force participation was 61.7%, slight up from 61.5% in March.

    The report found that average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls rose by 21 cents to $30.17.

     

     

  • March's Job Report: Rate Drops to 6.0%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | May 07, 2021

    March’s job report saw a gain of 916,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in leisure and hospitality, public and private education and construction.

    March’s unemployment rate dropped to 6.0%, down slightly from 6.2% in February. The civilian labor force participation was 61.5%, slight up from 61.4% in February.

    The report found that average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls fell by 4 cents to $29.96.

     

     

  • UNEMPLOYMENT IS HIGH. WHY ARE BUSINESSES STRUGGLING TO HIRE?

    by Robert Hoeft | Apr 27, 2021

    There are two distinct, and completely opposite, ways of looking at the
    American job market.

    One would be to consult the data tables produced every month by the Bureau
    of Labor Statistics, which suggest a plentiful supply of would-be workers. The
    unemployment rate is 6 percent, representing 9.7 million Americans who say
    they are actively looking for work.

    Alternately, you could search for news articles mentioning “labor shortage.”
    You will find dozens in which businesses, especially in the restaurant and other
    service industries, say they face a potentially catastrophic inability to hire. The
    anecdotes come from the biggest metropolitan areas and from small towns, as
    well as from tourist destinations of all varieties.

    If this apparent labor shortage persists, it will have huge implications for the
    economy in 2021 and beyond. It could act as a brake on growth and cause
    unnecessary business failures, long lines at remaining businesses, and rising
    prices.

    What explains the disconnect? There are competing theories, all plausible —
    and potentially interrelated.

    • Benefits too generous?
    • Worried about getting sick
    • Still needed at home
    • Reconsidering career decisions?

    Read the full article at https://nyti.ms/3sK6UuD

    Source: New York Times

  • US BUSINESSES OPTIMISTIC IN FEBRUARY, EMPLOYMENT EXPECTATIONS IMPROVE

    by Robert Hoeft | Mar 25, 2021

    US private-sector firms remained optimistic in February although there was a broad divergence in business confidence trends, according to the IHS Markit US Business Outlook. While manufacturers registered the strongest degree of optimism in future production since October 2014, service providers were less upbeat than in the previous survey period.

    “US private sector firms remained upbeat in February, with confidence regarding future output unchanged from that seen in October,” said Siân Jones, senior economist at IHS Markit. “Hopes of an end to the pandemic and resulting pick-up in demand drove optimism, but concerns regarding the longevity of the virus outbreak were still apparent.”

    Overall expectations regarding employment improved in February, the research found. The net balance of firms forecasting a rise in staffing numbers rose to 19%, the highest for two years. The uptick in predictions was led by manufacturers. At 34%, the net balance of goods producers that expect workforce numbers to increase was the strongest since June 2012. The net balance of service providers anticipating higher employment was unchanged from that seen in October at 16%.

    “As has been seen in recent national PMI surveys, price pressures and supplier shortages were key concerns for companies,” Jones said. “Manufacturers and service providers alike foresee sharp upticks in staff and non-staff costs. That said, goods producers were much more confident of being able to pass on a greater proportion of the price rise.”

    Overall, manufacturers were more confident of a recovery in operating conditions than their service-sector counterparts as ongoing social-distancing and travel restrictions continued to hamper demand for services.

    Source: Staffing Industry Analysts

  • February's Job Report: Rate Drops to 6.2%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Mar 05, 2021

    February’s job report saw a gain of 379,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment gains happened in leisure and hospitality, temporary help services, health and social assistance, retail trade, and manufacturing. Declines happened in state and local government, education, construction and mining.

    February’s unemployment rate dropped to 6.2%, down slightly from 6.3% in January. The civilian labor force participation was 61.4%, the same as January.

    The report found that in Friday, average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls increased by 7 cents to was $30.01.

     

     

  • WHY THE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE FELL IN JANUARY EVEN THOUGH U.S. JOB CREATION WAS VIRTUALLY NIL

    by Robert Hoeft | Feb 19, 2021

    The U.S. unemployment rate fell in January to a new pandemic low of 6.3% and is just several points above precrisis levels. Great news, right?

    Not exactly. The unemployment rate declined in January for the wrong reason and is much higher than what is officially being reported. 

    Last month the jobless rate slid to 6.3% from 6.7%, down by more than half compared to a pandemic high of 14.8%. The main reason the rate fell in January, however, is because the government said there were 406,000 fewer people in the labor force. Barely any new jobs were added last month.

    Once people stop looking for work, they are no longer counted in the official unemployment rate.

    Although the U.S. has regained about 12.5 million jobs since the pandemic lashed the economy last spring, fewer people in the labor force explains a sizable chunk of the decline in the unemployment rate.

    The size of the labor force has shrunk since last March by 4.3 million to 160.2 million. 

    So just how high is unemployment really? Economists estimate 9% to 10%.

    “Adjusting for the people that have dropped out of the labor force, by choice or obligation, the unemployment rate is around 9.5%,” estimated lead U.S. economist Lydia Boussour of Oxford Economics.

    Source: MarketWatch

  • January's Job Report: Rate Drops to 6.3%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Feb 05, 2021

    January’s job report saw a gain of 49,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. Employment rose in professional and business services and in public and private education, while losses happened in leisure and hospitality, retail trade, healthcare and in transportation and warehousing.

    January’s unemployment rate dropped to 6.3%, down from 6.7% in December. The civilian labor force participation was 61.4%, down slightly from 61.5% in December.

    The report found that in January, average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls increased by 6 cents to was $29.96.

     

     

  • US MANUFACTURING ACTIVITY SPEEDS UP IN DECEMBER

    by Robert Hoeft | Jan 25, 2021

    The US manufacturing economy continued its recovery in December, but labor difficulties remain, the Institute for Supply Management reported. Its Manufacturing PMI measure of economic activity in US manufacturing rose to a reading of 60.7% in December from 57.5% in November. Readings above 50% indicate expansion, and the jump from December indicates expansion at a faster pace.

    “Survey committee members reported that their companies and suppliers continue to operate in reconfigured factories, but absenteeism, short-term shutdowns to sanitize facilities and difficulties in returning and hiring workers are causing strains that are limiting manufacturing growth potential,” said Timothy Fiore, chair of the ISM’s Manufacturing Business Survey Committee. Fiore said the 60.7% reading for the Manufacturing PMI corresponds to a 5.2% increase in real gross domestic product on an annualized basis.

    Data for the ISM’s Manufacturing PMI come from purchasing and supply executives across the US.

    Source: Staffing Industry Analysts

  • 76% OF US COMPANIES SAY HIRING DEMAND WILL RETURN TO PRE-PANDEMIC LEVELS THIS YEAR

    by Robert Hoeft | Jan 25, 2021

    Hiring demand will approach, return to or exceed pre-pandemic levels this year, according to the 2021 Future of Recruiting Study published by CareerArc, a provider of a social recruiting platform. Of companies surveyed, 76% believe hiring demand will return this year.

    CareerArc’s survey also discovered that companies are most concerned about turnover this year. The survey found 39% of respondents believe at least one in five members of their workforce are currently looking for new jobs at other companies.

    The survey included 1,156 respondents, including 667 US adults and 489 human resources and hiring professionals. It took place between Nov. 16 and Dec. 14, 2020.

    Among workers, it found 61% of full-time employees in the US are seeking new jobs this year. Meanwhile, 88% of workers are concerned about the lack of jobs in their fields, and 68% attribute the lack of jobs to the continued impact of COVID-19.

    Other findings in the study included:

    • 82% of job seekers consider employer brand and reputation before applying for a job.
    • 26% of job seekers say diversity, equity and inclusion messages published by employers would make them more likely to apply to particular companies. In addition, 63% check social media for employee and consumer comments about workforce diversity at a company.

    Source: Staffing Industry Analysts

  • December's Job Report: Rate Remains at 6.7%

    by Kabnoog Xiong | Jan 08, 2021

    December’s job report saw a loss of 140,000 nonfarm jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly employment report. These changes are a reflection of the recent increase of COVID-19 cases. Employment rose in professional and business services, retail trade, and construction. Leisure and hospitality jobs declines.

    December’s unemployment rate remained at 6.7%, same as November. The civilian labor force participation was 61.5%, unchanged from November.

    The report found that in December, average hourly earnings for employees on private, nonfarm payrolls increased by 23 cents to was $29.81.

     

     

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